College students can now get microsoft office for free

melthemuslim:

Just go here and sign up with your college email. You can install it on up to 5 PCs or Macs and on other mobile devices, including Windows tablets and iPads.

hinomaru721:

Which one is your hairstyle??
Mine is 27 and 41
Pixiv
「すぴ」_
女の髪型女の髪型 | すぴ [pixiv] http://www.pixiv.net/member_illust.php?mode=medium&illust_id=41521254

jebbyfish:

So you want to make an OC?: A Masterpost of Ways to Create, Develop, and Make Good OCs!

i made this masterpost in hopes that it helps you in making your own OCs ah;; it can also apply to developing RP characters i suppose! if you’d like to add more resources then go for it sugar pea (´ヮ`)!

How to Write Better OCs:

Character Development:

Diversity

Mary Sue/Gary Stu

Villains

Relationships

ARCHETYPES

NAMES

APPEARANCE

DETAILS

again, this is to help inspire you or help establish your OCs! i hope you get a lot of info and help from this ahh ( ´ ▽ ` )ノ

homemadetoivaska:

me at night: ”Tomorrow I will wear something nice!”

next morning:

image

Things almost every author needs to research

clevergirlhelps:

the-right-writing:

  • How bodies decompose
  • Wilderness survival skills
  • Mob mentality
  • Other cultures
  • What it takes for a human to die in a given situation
  • Common tropes in your genre
  • Average weather for your setting

yoooo

masterpost for when u wanna draw!!

inarina:

can you tell the exact point in time where I stopped trying to make this into a comprehensible tutorial

ahhh but there you go anon! I hope you find this tutorial useful ahah;; I find that observing real life (or just googling up faces and expressions) really help with understanding faces and how they do the thing. So keep on practicing!

writingbox:

In the constant battle of ‘showing vs telling’, describing your character’s emotions is one place that telling can sneak into your writing.

Think about the physical effects of emotions in order to show how your character is feeling.

Don’t say they are nervous - show them refusing food, or repeatedly going to the toilet. Show them tapping their feet, drumming their hands, pacing the room. Show them checking their watch over and over, playing with their hair, or biting their lip.

Don’t say they are sad - show them retreating to their bedroom, show them listening to sad songs, or not paying attention to the television in front of them. Show them hugging a pillow, hiding under the duvet, writing angsty poetry. Show them crying, wailing, shaking, rocking. Show them eating ice cream, chocolate, cake.

Don’t say they are excited - show them chattering away, jumping up and down, clapping their hands. Show them grinning, laughing, hugging their friends. Show them dancing, running in circles, doing cartwheels.

Don’t just tell your readers what your characters are feeling; show them the physical effects of the emotion - physical effects that your readers can relate to. It will make your characters more real, more animated, and it will bring your readers closer to them.

anthroanim:

artist-help:

Pushing poses by Shermcohen

[x] [x]

I can tell, long time ago I saw this, and true this is one of the most useful things at the moment to pose a character in 3D. worth a reblog